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Eleven opium shops operating in Victoria

Victoria had eleven opium shops, earning $3 million per year. The BC Government imposed a $500 license fee per year on opium manufacturers (GM, 76). By 1884, Twelve opium factories operated in Victoria, up from one factory in 1881.

(CTC, 68)

Timeline Date

Sun, 1883-07-01

Display Date

1883

Knights of Columbus form lodge in Victoria

The Knights of Columbus formed a lodge in Victoria, protested presence of Chinese labour.

(CCL, 19)

Timeline Date

Sun, 1883-07-01

Display Date

1883

US passes Chinese Exclusion Act

United States passed the Chinese Exclusion Act – no Chinese labourers could enter the United States for ten years. Chinese workers who had moved to BC to work on the CPR did not have option to return to the US.

(CCL, 19; CTC, 50)

Timeline Date

Mon, 1882-05-08

Display Date

8 May 1882

Victoria elects anti-Chinese mayor

Noah Shakespeare, an opponent of Chinese immigration, was elected mayor of Victoria (CCL, 18)

Timeline Date

Sat, 1882-07-01

Display Date

1882

Chinese workers arrive to work on CPR

Chinese workers recruited by contractors began to arrive in Victoria en route to construction jobs on the Canadian Pacific Railway. (GM, 44) Over 17,000 Chinese immigrants came to Canada between 1881 and 1884.

(CTC, 22)

Timeline Date

Fri, 1881-07-01 - Tue, 1884-07-01

Display Date

1881 - 1884

Canadian Chinese population 4,383

Canadian census reports that Chinese population was 4,383. Of these, 4,350 resided in British Columbia.

(CCL, 14)

Timeline Date

Fri, 1881-07-01

Display Date

1881

Victoria Chinatown population 592

Population of Victoria’s Chinatown was 592 (CCL, 20).

Timeline Date

Fri, 1881-07-01

Display Date

1881

US bans sale of opium, dealers move to Victoria

United States prohibited the production and sale of opium. Opium production and sale remained legal in Canada. Opium merchants moved from San Francisco to Victoria’s Chinatown.

(GM, 75-76)

Timeline Date

Thu, 1880-07-01

Display Date

1880

Chinese labourers recruited to build CPR

Andrew Onderdonk asked Lee Tin Poy, a Chinese labour contractor in Portland, to recruit 1,500 Chinese workers from the United States for employment on the Canadian Pacific Railway.

(CCL, 18)

Timeline Date

Thu, 1880-07-01

Display Date

1880

Government committee formed to study Chinese immigration

John A. Macdonald established a Select Committee to study the question of Chinese immigration and employment in BC. Amor de Cosmos was the chair of the committee.

(CTC, 48-49)

Timeline Date

Tue, 1879-07-01

Display Date

1879